Chitown Homecare https://chitownhomecare.com Matching Ethnic and Culture Heritage Thu, 13 Sep 2018 12:35:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.3 https://chitownhomecare.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/cropped-Logo-Updated-PNG-2-e1531820770540-1-32x32.png Chitown Homecare https://chitownhomecare.com 32 32 Kathleen’s Golden Years https://chitownhomecare.com/kathleens-golden-years/ Wed, 12 Sep 2018 10:25:27 +0000 http://chitown.maarsorbit.com/?p=1128 The post Kathleen’s Golden Years appeared first on Chitown Homecare.

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Kathleen was a content grandmother, wrapping up her career as a manager of a large catering service. Her husband Fred of 30 years was a successful insurance broker. They had accumulated a large savings. She and Fred invested in and moved into a retirement community which provided limited on site medical care and three meals a day for those residents who did not want to prepare their own meals. Kathy loved art. She spent several hours a day on these pastimes. Her family heritage and native language was Italian. She sang Karaoke songs and drew pictures or painted scenes. Years passed and Kathy was now retired for several years. She was approaching age 77 and physical limitations were taking their toll. She began to use a walker and could not drive herself. Then Fred passed away from an unexpected heart attack. Kathy was on her own with the helpful, but limited assistance of the retirement community. The aging process continued to take its toll. Kathy was unable to cook herself and the meals at the retirement community seldom included the Italian foods she craved. Going shopping, medical appointments, and church were increasingly difficult. Her daughter and only child of their marriage lived 1000 miles away and could not visit much. Especially at night, she began to experience vision problems. Despite the physical limitations, her mind was norsmal and she wanted to be active. Delving into the savings she and Fred had accumulated was not easy. Kathy consulted with her daughter and financial advisor (a mutual friend through Fred) and decided upon a budget for home care assistance with transportation and sometimes cooking meals. She also wanted to learn about emails and computers to keep better touch with the outside world. She yearned for a companion who shared her memories of Italian language/food and desire to visit art museums in her metropolitan community. She needed assistance with new technologies to keep in touch with her daughter and grandchildren. Finding the home care provider for these needs was not easy. Her friends recommended places they had heard about or used. Through a careful search and selection process by a home care agency, Kathy and her daughter were able to locate a caregiver and other support staff who matched the cultural and ethnic background, interest in art and other needs to provide emotional satisfaction for her lifetime.

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Carlos – Happy in his own world https://chitownhomecare.com/carlos-happy-in-his-own-world/ Wed, 12 Sep 2018 10:25:00 +0000 http://chitown.maarsorbit.com/?p=1126 The post Carlos – Happy in his own world appeared first on Chitown Homecare.

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Maria and Juan anxiously awaited the birth of their third child. Carlos was not like others. From birth he could not control his limb movements and was diagnosed with cerebral palsy. Despite the physical disabilities, his mind functioned fairly well. He shared emotions like happiness and sadness. He spoke with some slurring. Both Carlos’ parents had full time jobs – Maria was a nurse and Juan operated a busy restaurant. Between the two, neither could keep up with the needs of Carlos as he grew. How to educate and train a child with special needs was a challenge. Carlos could use one arm to move a specially constructed wheelchair and his fingers allowed him to move a few objects. He could not feed himself or attend the local school system. He needed assistance for most activities of daily living. Maria and Juan wanted him to learn their native Mexican language and to read. Other family members wanted to help, but Carlos’ needs required more than they had time for. His parents turned to a home care agency to assist his growth and development in the world he knew. The agency provided several Mexican speaking caregivers who spent time to read books, converse, and play games with Carlos. The home care aides followed Carlos’ dietary restrictions to create special Mexican dishes. They kept Carlos active with daily walks and trips to local parks, museums, and other places using the company’s wheelchair access van.

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Parkinsonian Bill https://chitownhomecare.com/parkinsonian-bill/ Wed, 12 Sep 2018 10:24:13 +0000 http://chitown.maarsorbit.com/?p=1124 The post Parkinsonian Bill appeared first on Chitown Homecare.

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Bill was 35 years old and led an active life in sports. He was in great physical shape, loved to play soccer, and watch stock car racing. He even hung out at the track with some of the drivers. In the past he served active military duty in the Middle East for 3 years. Now he was employed as a financially successful computer hardware sales representative and had his own house. He began feeling unsteady on his feet – out of balance and almost falling at times. Then his right hand began shaking-making holding hold a glass difficult. His girlfriend Pam began questioning his masculinity and their relationship. After a few months she broke up with him. Bill’s tremors spread to his left hand and he took a nasty fall one day at the race track and broke his left arm. His family and friends encouraged him to see a doctor which he put off not wanting to acknowledge the physical changes to his body. The Veteran’s Administration primary care physician sent him to a neurological specialist who diagnosed early onset Parkinson’s Disease. Perhaps due to chemical exposure in the military or race car fumes, but the cause could not be pinpointed. The neurologist said to monitor the condition and if necessary treatment with Sinemet could be implemented. The tremors got worse over the next year to the point where cooking food was difficult – Bill could not hold the plates, dishes, and cups and often dropped and broke them. His mother stopped by to help or to bring prepared food. Bill loved southern style Cajun food but could not make it to suit his taste anymore. Emotionally Bill was treading water with the loss of his girlfriend and increasing physical limitations. He came home to an empty house and camped in front of the cable television watching the sports and car racing events he once participated in. Then one day his entire body froze up and he nearly wrecked his car while making sales calls. Unable to continue driving, Bill had to convey the message to his employer about the need for ADA accommodations. He was given a desk job but his pay was reduced more than 50% without sales commissions. Then a downturn in the business cycle for his company led to his layoff. Fortunately, Bill was qualified for two programs – VA medical assistance and long term disability benefits from his employment. He was steered by his physicians to accept home care assistance for 10 hours a day, 7 days a week. The home car aides were diligent in preparing his meals, driving him places in their cars, and provided companionship. What was lacking was the caregivers did not share common interests with Bill to fulfill the emotional gaps. He wanted a caregiver with an interest in sports and some skill in cooking Cajun foods.

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John the Plumber https://chitownhomecare.com/john-the-plumber/ Wed, 12 Sep 2018 10:23:12 +0000 http://chitown.maarsorbit.com/?p=1122 The post John the Plumber appeared first on Chitown Homecare.

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John was an energetic plumber who never missed a day of work.  Loved his family and job.  Always took care of what his wife Tricia needed for home maintenance projects.  John turned 56 and started feeling more and more tired.  One day he was too weak to turn the wrench and break a connection on a pipeline to the water heater.  Something was wrong and Tricia knew it.  John never wanted to believe when doctors said he had less than 18 months to live with stage 4 lung cancer.   Tricia wanted to believe chemotherapy treatments would work.  John doubted the treatments would succeed but decided to go ahead for his family and kept the pain inside.  The drugs initially worked and imaging showed tumors shrinking for a couple months, but that was all as the tumor growth returned.  The prognosis was for a steady downhill slide in his physical condition.  Tricia had a part time job in office administration, and the inability of John to financially contribute forced her to work longer hours.   She watched his ability to physically function being sapped away day by day.  Tricia was tormented by the feeling of having to be away part of the day when John needed her the most. The four children from their 35 year marriage tried to fill the voids that John’s deterioration created in home maintenance and other projects around the house.  They visited as frequently as possible.  But two lived out of state and one was over 50 miles away.  All had full time jobs and their own children.   The youngest child, their daughter Vicky, lived nearby but was divorced, had two young children and a part time job.  John began having trouble walking and was no longer able to drive a car.  The children met together and via telephone /email to discuss, between the tears, what no one had dreamed of a few months earlier.  John was a big man – over 200 pounds – even with the weight loss he recently experienced from the cancer – and Mom was unable to handle the physical demands or emotional stress of condition.  Dad was going to need to help with basic tasks of showering, getting in and out of bed and ultimately feeding himself, brushing his teeth, and shaving.  A hoist was needed to move him around. Dad was not attentive to taking his multiple medications and Mom’s work schedule prevented her from tracking timing and dosage.  As much as they tried, the children, with their own family and personal obligations, could not find enough extra hours among themselves to stay with Dad 24 hours a day.  Although she lived nearby, Vicky was in no position to assume the additional burden of parental care and was experiencing sleepless nights worrying. Getting outside help was expensive as insurance, disability, and governmental benefits were limited. The process of collecting information about available benefits was an endless chore of waiting on hold for information by telephone and accessing numerous websites designed for marketing rather than conveying convenient and useful information about benefits. Finally the eldest son John, Jr. said it was time to bite the bullet and seek home care assistance despite the cost that would require out of pocket contributions by all the children. Two were initially opposed, but ultimately agreed with John, Jr. Mom balked and said she could handle the matters herself without the kids spending their money and time. The kids moved forward with their plans and began to interview potential sources of home care and home health care. Vicky agreed to be the one to communicate the decision to Mom and ease her into the new world of a home care assistant for 5 days a week, 10 hours a day. To be continued . . .

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